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Software smart bomb aimed at Iran: experts
Computer security experts are studying a new cyber weapon: a software smart bomb that may have been crafted to find and sabotage a nuclear facility in Iran.

Malicious software, or malware, dubbed 'Stuxnet' is able to recognise a specific facility's control network and then destroy it, according to German computer security researcher Ralph Langner.

"Welcome to cyber war," says Langner in a post at his website. "This is sabotage."

Langner has been analysing Stuxnet since it was discovered in June and say the code had a technology fingerprint of the control system it was seeking and would go into action automatically when it found its target.

"It's pretty amazing," says James Lewis, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "It looks like more than simple cyber espionage."

Stuxnet was tailored for Siemens supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems commonly used to manage water supplies, oil rigs, power plants and other industrial facilities.

It travelled by sneaking onto USB memory sticks and was able to thereby hop from system to system without needing the Internet, according to Roel Schouwenberg, senior anti-virus researcher at Kaspersky Lab Americas.
Malware 'worm'

Stuxnet is considered a malware 'worm' because it burrows from machine to machine, replicating itself on the way.

Once in a computer system, Stuxnet checked for any of three Siemens SCADA programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that manage functions such as cooling or turbine speed, says Schouwenberg.

According to Schouwenberg, if there was a match, Stuxnet automatically took over control of the PLC and hid any changes from workers operating or managing a system.

"When the operator looks at the plant, everything will look just fine," says Schouwenberg. "Meanwhile, the machine will be overloading. Its ultimate goal is cyber sabotage."

"Stuxnet manipulates a fast running process," says Langner at his website. "We can expect that something will blow up soon. Something big."

The software saboteur has been found lurking on systems in India, Indonesia, Pakistan and elsewhere, but the heaviest infiltration appeared to be in Iran, according to software security researchers.

"This was assembled by a highly qualified team of experts, involving some with specific control system expertise," says Langner.

"This is not some hacker sitting in the basement of his parents' house. The resources needed to stage this attack point to a nation state."

The pattern of spread correlated somewhat with jobs handled by a firm commissioned to work at nuclear facilities, according to researchers.
Bushehr delays

Langner suspected Stuxnet's mark was the Bushehr nuclear facility in Iran. Unspecified problems have been blamed for a delay in getting the facility fully operational.

On 31 August, Iranian atomic chief Ali Akbar Salehi blamed "severe hot weather" for a delay in moving fuel rods into its Russian-built first nuclear power plant.

"Look at the Iranian nuclear program," says Langner. "Strange - they are presently having some technical difficulties down there in Bushehr."

There have been Stuxnet infections all over the world and it was impossible to be certain the target was Iran, says Schouwenberg.

Stuxnet creators left plenty of clues in the malware, giving the impression they didn't fear being caught, according to Langner.

"The whole attack only makes sense within a very limited timeframe," he says. "After Stuxnet is analysed, the attack won't work anymore. It's a one-shot weapon."

Microsoft has already patched two of four Windows operating system vulnerabilities exploited by Stuxnet, according to Schouwenberg.

"For the most part, Stuxnet has been mitigated," the researcher says. "The question now is whether this is going to be a one-off thing or is it setting a precedent?"

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